The Pottery Post Blog
 

Grow & Dry Potted Basil



 855-Potted-Basil

How to dry fresh basil.

You may ask why we are bringing up drying basil in the dead of winter?  Well, we think you should be planning now what herbs, flowers, and plants you want to grow in garden containers this coming spring.  So maybe if we tell you how to dry potted basil (popular herb) and why you want to dry it, you will include it in your coming garden décor.

 856-Dried-Basil-From-Th

Dried basil in flowerpots can be used in so many cooking recipes.  Sauces, pesto, chicken and pasta dishes.  It really is one of the most used and desired herbs you can pot and grow at home.  And, have you ever priced basil at the grocery store?  argh.

 854 Potted Basil Plant

If you donít want to grow your own basil in flowerpots you can always dry any fresh basil that you purchase at the grocery store.

After harvesting the basil grown in clay planters, make sure itís gently washed.  Lay the basil bunches in a dish strainer or on a kitchen towel where they can dry completely.  Remove as much stem as possible because they donít dry so well.

 853-Clay-Pot-Filled-Wit

Preheat your oven to the lowest setting.  Line a baking sheet with parchment and spread leaves out so they arenít touching. Place in the oven for around 1 to 2 hrs. checking every 15 mins or so.  You donít want the leaves to burn but just feel dry to the touch.  Remove and cool completely.  Now you can crumble it up removing any stems.  Bottle the crumbles and store in a cabinet out of sunlight.

 857-Dried-Basil-From-Fl

See how simple this is!  You can easily grow and dry your own basil in almost any size and kind of flowerpot.  By using a clay planter instead of planting directly into your yard or garden, you can container the roots from spreading.  We like to grow all herbs in terracotta clay instead of other types of garden pottery because the clay will breathe and that is good for creating healthy roots.  So, if you have clay flowerpots or any clay planters laying around use those first.  Just make sure they are large enough to hold the number of herbs you want to grow.

[Read More] Better Berries Potted

[Read More] Potted Chili Peppers
potted basil, grow basil in flowerpots, dry potted basil, basil dried



By
Post Last Updated: 2/20/2020 2:02:42 PM 

Plant Leaves In Clay Planters



 682-Potted-Leaves-Potte


How to create interesting garden containers

If you have a green thumb touch, or maybe not so much here are some tips that may help when it comes to what types of plant materials to pot in your garden containers.  Of course, everyoneís tastes are different and we encourage that, but these tips can work in general ways also.  These tips also work with all types of garden containers.  Clay flowerpots, Clay Planters, Concrete Pottery, Glazed flowerpots, tall, thin and window box pottery.  Make it simple and keep it simple!

 684-Potted-Lambs-Ear-An

Mix different leaf textures & sizes
Potting green plants in your home and garden pottery or containers is not the most exciting thing to do but if you think about it, they make a wonderful filler for very little financial investment.  If you put your palms, flowers, bulbs or succulents in the center of your planter and fill the border with leaves and greens you will have a much fuller flower pot arrangement without a lot of expense.

Sample:

Lambís Ear:  We love these silky soft leaves.   They range from pale yellow to deep emerald green and have a fuzzy softness to them.  These are great when planted in clay planters all alone because they grow fast and provide lots of colors as well as filler.  The leaves have almost a light grey cast to them because of all the fuzz.  Love it!

 686-Potted-Lambs-Ear-In

Ferns:  Ferns are known for their feathery tapered leaves.  They range in too many colors to list here but they are perfect as filler or as stand-alone.  Each leaf has a natural bend to it so it looks lovely draped on the outside of your clay flowerpots and glazed planters.  Ferns are also perfect for patio or porch hanging terracotta planters.

 687-Potted-Fern-In-Clay

Hosta:  These leaves are little paddles that look lovely when mixed with spikey flowers or plants that have height.  A deep green that complements all colors of flowers, even white.  When mixed with other green leaf plants they add a tremendous contrast in color and style to all your clay planters or clay flowerpots.

 683-Potted-Hosta-Leaves

So hopefully these few suggestions can spark some inspiration in you and make potting up your home and garden planters, clay flowerpots or clay window box planters easier, more enjoyable and lovely to look at.
 688-Clay-Planters

[Read More]The best climbing vines for flowerpots & clay planters
[Read More] Your Indoor Potted Ferns.


By
Post Last Updated: 2/5/2020 1:17:59 PM 

Yummy - Easy - Healthy Potted Garlic



 580-Garlic-In-Garden-Co

Looking for something easy to plant and grow in a decorative patio pot, something healthy to eat, wonderful to smell, and looks good in a garden planter?  GARLIC!


If you have never tried to grow garlic in a garden container and watch it grow so you can harvest it, then you are missing out for sure.  Itís really so easy and fun to do.  Great for kids and older adults alike.  Just follow a few easy tips and you can have great success growing your potted garlic.

 582-Garlic-In-Flowerpot

As we all know, garlic is one of the most popular herbs you can grow.  Itís used in almost all recipes from spaghetti sauce, to stir fry and everything in between.  Garlic is reported to be a wonderful medicinal plant owing to its preventive characteristics in cardiovascular diseases, regulating blood pressure, lowering blood sugar and cholesterol levels, effective against bacterial, viral, fungal and parasitic infections, enhancing the immune system and so much more.

 581-Potted-Garlic-Plant

The first thing to consider is the right type of garlic to plant in your flowerpot.  If you live in a cold climate purchase Hard neck. The Soft neck kind is better for warmer climates.  You can google this for more information.  The second thing to consider is where you will place the garden containers once they are planted.  The best place to locate your pottery is where they will get full sun.  A patio area or yard and garden area where they can get direct sun without an overhang or awning.

 583-Grow-Garlic-In-Flow

When selecting the container to grow the garlic in you will need one that is at least 6 inches (15 cm.) deep and has excellent drainage. The garden container also needs to be big enough to leave 6 inches (15 cm.) of space between cloves.  We recommend a terracotta planter, window box, or garden bowl because the clay breathes and is healthy for the soil and garlic to get good air circulation.  But most any garden container will yield success.

 584-Garlic-In-Garden-Co

Start with fresh potting mix.  Donít reuse mix from year after year in any of your flowerpots, because the garlic will deplete the nutrients in the soil.  Separate the cloves carefully and set them into the mix pointy side up about 4 to 6 inches into the soil.  Space apart.  Top with soil and mulch the planter.

 585-Potted-Garlic-Clove

Donít overwater these planters.  Allow the soil to dry a bit between watering but never dry out completely.  Feed each flowerpot with fertilizer during the active growing season to help things along.  Stop fertilizing the potted garlic mid-summer when the leaves begin to turn brown and die back.  You will know when to harvest when half or more of the leaves have died.  That is the time to dig up the bulbs.

 586-Garlic-Grown-In-Gar

Dig them up being careful not to bruise or cut them.  Lay them out to dry for 2 to 3 weeks in a shady area or in a garage.  When the roots feel brittle, rub them off along with excess dirt, but leave the papery skins intact.  You can now store them in bunches, braid them or cut off the stems a few inches above the bulb.  Store on a screen or shelf where they will get good cool, dry air.

See how simple this all is.  You just do a few things the right way and the garlic will reward you with healthy, plentiful amounts of cloves for use

[Read More] Your Indoor Potted Ferns Need Help
[Read More] Pots Within Pots
garlic potted, garlic in flowerpots, potted garlic, grow garlic in flowerpots, garden containers, pottery, planters, pots, arizona pottery



By
Post Last Updated: 1/20/2020 2:55:15 PM 

Protect Perennials For Winter



 425-Protect-Perennials-


Now that we are in the middle of Winter how are you unprotected flowerpot perennials doing?  If you havenít taken any steps to protect them this will be your last chance.  Snow and freezing temps can really dish out a beating on your outdoor potted plants.  Without these added steps they can become damaged and possibly not make it till next Spring.

 426-Potted-Hydrangea

When looking at your potted rosebushes, flowers, and grasses you need to decide if they need to be cut back so by next spring new growth will appear.  Maybe the planters, want to keep all the dead foliage as a layer of protection from the cold weather, then itís best to leave it alone. 

We all know how a planter of roses needs to be cut back to ensure next seasons growth.  Whether you decide to cut back or leave as is the perennial garden containers you have they all can use a nice dose of mulch.  Mulch will act as a barrier between the cold and freezing roots.  Lay a blanket of fall leaves, some shredded hay or a layer of pinecones, rocks or nuts in the shell.  Create a blanket for the potting mix and plants roots to sleep in comfortably.

 427-Perennials-In-Winte

Potted grasses have become very popular over the last few years. They provide a unique almost contemporary look to your homes landscaping and outdoor décor.  They love to be cut back to not only keep them looking their best but to help them conserve their energy during the cold winter months.  Come Spring they will grow again in the colorful vibrant foliage you desire.

 428-Perennials-In-Winte

Hydrangea planters donít need to be cut back but if you do so you will be richly rewarded with larger blooms next Spring.  If you choose not to cut them back or just missed the time of year to do so donít worry.  Come next Spring you will still get smaller flowers but the older branches will grow studier.

[Read More] Create An Evergreen Garden
[Read More] Create An Outdoor Living Space




By
Post Last Updated: 2/19/2019 2:48:46 PM 

Squirrels In Your Flowerpots



 410-Squirrels-In-Flower


Squirrels digging in your flowerpots?

Come on who doesnít think squirrels are cute?  When you went out of the porch to water your flowerpots you noticed some digging in the potting mix or a few nibbles off the leaves is taking place.  Well, we donít believe in harming animals when there are perfectly natural ways to keep them away. It just takes a few simple steps for you to achieve results.

 411-Squirrels-And-Flowe

Many animals donít like the scent of different types of herbs & spices.  So, letís start there.  Sprinkle cayenne pepper around the plants and the scent will keep them away.  Sprinkling ground herbs around living plants are used a lot and will not harm the plants at all.  Paprika or Red Pepper Flakes work also.  Of course, after a bit of time more will need to be added but if it works, then why not!

 412

If you have thought a time or two about potting some herbs try mixing your garden planters with potted flowers and herbs.  Mix Mint in with other plants and the scent will keep squirrels away.  This not only looks beautiful but if you like the smell of mint having a bit in your garden containers will only add to your enjoyment.

 414-Cayenne-On-Flowerpo

If the digging is getting out of hand, try laying a layer of mulch, hay, toys, nuts in the shell, seashells, colored rocks or marbles on the top of the potting mix.  The squirrels wonít want to touch them and dig around them to get to the roots of the plant and will move on to an easier next victim.  This can also be fun and give your flowerpots a finish almost decorative look.

 413-Squirrels-Eating-Fl


[Read More] Small Space Garden Center
[Read More] Fruit and Berries in Flowerpots



By
Post Last Updated: 2/19/2019 1:04:19 PM 

The Best Climbing Vines



 350-The-Best-Climbing-P


Do you have a patio wall that is blank and ugly?  You never seem to find the right piece of art that can hang outside and look good year after year.  How about a porch that needs some help for added color and beauty? 

Try a climbing vine in a pot.  These vines are easy to grow in a flowerpot and will add a vertical touch to your porch or patio décor.  Here are a few suggestions to help you get started.  Remember though that there are many types of climbers that will work good in a flowerpot so donít limit yourself to the ones listed below.

 348-Climbing-Ivy-Potted

IVY Ė We all know Ivy and love it.  You see it growing outside a traditional home as well as an English Tudor style.  It is virtually one of the best climbers to pot and is great for beginners because of its hardy growth.  Potted Ivy likes a wide and shallow container better than a narrow and deep one but that shouldnít limit you.  This climber likes most size pots! Place around the outside of any garden planter where you want it to grow over the side.  Set your garden container next to the wall you want it to grow on and attache it to make it climb as it grows.  Beautiful.

 347-Climbing-Hydreangea

CLIMBING HYDRANGEA Ė Everyone knows hydrangea.  The smell and beautiful blooms make is a wonderful addition to any garden container.  Since it can grow up to 70 feet long itís perfect for a patio wall or porch.  The main thing to consider is the larger the planter you can handle the better.  This time of climbing vine likes room to grow to stay healthy.  Use a trellis in the planter and have the vine weave in and out of it to create a vertical barrier for privacy.

 349-Climbing-Potted-Flo

BOUGAINVILLEA Ė In Arizona, we all know this climbing shrub very well.  Itís shocking pink blooms and sharp thorny vine make it unforgettable. It is super easy to grow and will add a tropical touch to any garden planter or porch railing.  If you live in a harsh climate you will have to protect this potted shrub from winters cold.  Place the pot next to a pillar and have it climb up creating a living explosion of color.

There are many climbers you can try like Sweet Pea, Jasmine, Black Eyed Susan, & Passion Flower.  Donít limit yourself and create lovely garden planters and vertical gardens.


[Read More] Indoor Planted Trees
[Read More] Bring Spring Inside During Winter
potted climbing vines, pottery, planters, pots, terracotta, garden, flowerpots





By
Post Last Updated: 1/15/2019 8:39:39 AM 

Potted Wheatgrass



 52-Potted-Wheatgrass


You have seen more than enough articles and blog posts on how to grow herbs, veggies and succulents. 
Now that the public is becoming more health aware they are potting up and growing their own food and edibles.  Here are some easy and fun tips for growing Wheat grass.

Wheat grass is a flavorful way to get more greens into your diet.  By planting a tray of it you will always have this healthy option close at hand.  Hereís howÖ

 53-Potted-Wheatgrass

Start by selecting a shallow container.  Bonsai dishes, oval and square garden planters, garden bowls and wok planters all work with great success.  You donít need a deep flowerpot or tray to grow wheat grass since the seeds are not buried but lay on top of the soil to grow.

 54potted-Wheatgrass

Purchase seeds from your local garden center.  Fill the garden pot with soil mix about 1Ē deep.  Gently compress the soil mix in the planter.  Water soil till moist but not dripping wet.  Cover about half the planting area with seeds but try to make sure they donít touch.  Lightly compress the seeds into the soil.  Cover the pot with a lid or upturned plant saucer.
 56potted-Wheat-Grass Check the potted seeds and moisture twice a day.  When seeds germinate, remove lid and place the flowerpot in a warm indoors area where there is sun.  Check daily for water moisture.  Harvest with scissors any wheat grass that is 6í high.  The wheat grass will grow back a second time after harvesting.  

When spent, toss everything into the compost pile and start over with a cleaned out flowerpot.

Suggestions:  Juice the grass, blend the whole grass in a smoothie, add to a salad mix or to any soup dish.

[Read More] Pot Tips You Can Use Everyday
[Read More] October Around The House
wheatgrass in flowerpots, pottery, planters, pots, arizonapottery,


By
Post Last Updated: 10/16/2018 2:52:30 PM 

Grow Ginger In Flowerpots



 33-Grow-Ginger-In-Flowe

If you read any health or cooking magazine, you have read how healthy Ginger is and how everyone should be using it.  At Arizona Pottery we think you should grow your own in decorative flowerpots and garden containers.  Itís easy and fun to do, so here are some tips.

With your life so busy, you may ask ďWhy would I want to grow my own Ginger?Ē  Well, by potting up your own you are sure there are no pesticides or other harmful ingredients added to the potting soil or water.  And, it saves money.  If you start using more ginger then you can save some real money by growing your own in flowerpots.

 36-Ginger-In-Garden-Pla

First thing is to select a garden container or planter to use for potting.  Since Ginger grows horizonally we suggest a wide pot.  Garden Bowls or wok styles are perfect.  Just make sure the planter is wider then deeper and has good drainage.  Use rich potting mix that allows good drainage. This is not the time for heavy soil that will cause root rot.

 34-Ginger-In-Garden-Con

Next go to the store and find ginger pieces that have new growth buds on them if possible.  This little bud will grow between the large arms.  If there arenít any then buy what the store offers anyway.  Once you get it home, soak in water for 24 hrs to remove growth inhibitor, and dirt.

 37-Ginger-In-Pots

If no buds on the ginger, place in a window until buds start sprouting.  Could take a couple of days.  Then place the piece of ginger in potting soil and cover with an inch of soil.  You donít need to pack it all the way to the top of the planter.  Leave some room for watering.

Place the garden container in indirect sunlight indoors because it doesnít like wind or direct sun.  Water regularly, making sure soil is damp but never soggy.  It takes months to grow so be patient.  It ranges from 3 to 8 months where you can start to pull of sections of the plant to use.  And if you want you can even transplant them into other garden planters and give as gifts, to neighbors or co-workers.

 38-Ginger-For-Cooking

Ginger is so healthy.  Just google it and you will be amazed at the healing properties.  Use in smoothies, tea, oatmeal and on most food where it adds a delightful taste.  Ginger can be grated, sauteed, sliced, julienned and used on most all food groups.

[Read More] Container Gardening For Food.
[Read More] How to Grow A Potted Cactus
diy ginger in flowerpots, potted ginger, planters, garden, pottery, pots



By
Post Last Updated: 10/24/2018 2:17:50 PM 

Tiny Pots



 8843-Tiny-Flowerpots

Every one loves tiny pots.  Right now the rage is tiny homes, tiny cars, tiny pots...why not!!!
Small garden containers are big on charm but quick to dry out.  Keep your tiny pots in tip top shape by following these easy tips.

 8841-Tiny-Pots

Place your tiny pot containers where you unwind in the evening or drink your morning coffee.  That way you won't forget to water them.  Group your small pots together for a big visual appeal and easy one stop watering.  Try grouping them by color, style or type.  All red pots, all terra-cotta planters, all colors of the rainbow.  This is the time to get creative and playful.

 8840-Small-Garden-Plante

Get your creative juices flowing when it comes to selecting the containers.  Use coffee mugs, decorative saucers, children's toys, baskets, bowls or birdhouses.  Any type of container that can hold a small amount of potting soil and water

 8842-Tiny-Planters 

Fill your tiny pots with similar plants that have similar watering needs.  All succulents, cactus, sedums....preferably drought hardy plants.  Mix all greens or add a mix of colors to create a cohesive look.  If you have room, top the potting soil with small pebbles. The rocks will keep the moisture in the soil from evaporating.  Idea:  top with colored rocks, small beads, small toys.

 8839-Tiny-Pots

Finally if you set your containers in a saucer of sand the sand will absorb excess drainage and then allow the pots to wick moisture back up as they dry out.  Damp sand also makes great sipping stations for butterflies.  So you get double the loveliness!

We all love small decorative containers.  If you just head the warning about watering you should be able to create some lovely and playful creations that will last a long time and bring smiles to everyone face.

Enjoy!

[Read More] The Best Container Veggies
[Read More] Potted Chickweed
tiny pots, small planters, tiny pottery, small garden pots, pottery, pots



By
Post Last Updated: 4/4/2018 11:45:49 AM 

Let's Talk Citrus in Pots



 8823-Potted-Citrus

Growing a citrus tree in a flowerpot is nothing new.  Gardeners have been doing this for many years.  The attractive and edible fruit make these very popular and wanted by most folks whether they have a home or apartment.  With a sunny window and a bit of space anyone can grow fruit in a garden planter.

 8821-Citrus-In-Garden-Po

Of course we feel the most important place to start is choosing the correct garden container.  We recommend terracotta of course.  Most terracotta breathes and is very healthy for a plants roots.  It also drains well so it's a healthy choice for moisture control in the soil of pots.  If you decided to use a different type of garden planter that doesn't dry out then you may incur issues.  A citrus trees roots like to dry out between watering's and do not like to sit in moist soil.

 8820-Citrus-In-Garden-Po

When it comes to the size of the pot believe it or not a citrus plant does not like to be in a huge oversized pot.  They really don't mind being root bound in a planter which we normally don't recommend and this is because they like it and tend to remain healthy.  When selecting a potting mix they aren't fussy.  Just make sure it's well draining  and includes some limestone.

 8822-Citrus-Plants-In-Ga

Most plants but especially citrus require lots of light so place the potted plants in a sunny window or outdoor area.  Bring the planters outside when the weather reaches a 60 degree temp on a regular basis.  Place them in full sun for at least half a day.

 8825

When it comes to maintaining the potted citrus plants water with a light hand.  Do not over water and make sure that the planter drains well after each watering.  It's ok to wait until the plant shows a little wilting even.  When it comes to fertilizing a regular program is the best.  So feed the potted plant when it is actively growing and stop during winter.

 8824-Potted-Citrus

Also when it comes to pruning try to prune only when necessary.  Even if the plant starts to look unsightly hold off until after the first fruit is picked.  In general most potted citrus plants like to be left alone so try your best not to interfere.  And lastly, pick fruit when ripened.  Or if you prefer just leave it alone for a decorative look and wonderful fragrance.  This way they make wonderful houseplants!

[Read More]  Need help transplanting plant!
[Read More] What to plant now.
citrus potted, potted citrus, citrus in planters, citrus in pots, gardening



By
Post Last Updated: 3/13/2018 8:34:24 AM 



Latest Posts
Grow & Dry Potted Basil..
Bring Succulents Indoors For Winter..
A Few Reasons to Use Clay Flowerpots in Your Yard..
Plant Leaves In Clay Planters..
Save Water With Ollas..

26
Posts by Date
 2020

 2019

 2018
December (1)
November (8)
October (7)
September (3)
July (6)
June (3)
May (2)
April (7)
March (9)
February (3)
January (6)

 2017
December (6)
November (7)
October (8)
September (9)
August (8)
July (9)
June (6)
May (7)
April (5)
March (9)
February (9)
January (10)

 2016
December (8)
November (8)
October (7)
September (8)
August (7)
July (5)
June (2)
May (2)
April (5)
March (10)
January (10)

 2015
December (13)
November (6)
October (7)
September (4)
August (4)
July (4)
June (4)
May (6)
April (3)
March (6)
February (4)
January (2)

 2014

 2013

 2012
December (8)
November (5)
October (8)
September (9)
August (8)
July (9)
June (4)
May (12)
April (13)
March (11)
February (11)
January (10)

 2011
December (10)
November (9)
October (11)
September (9)
August (5)
July (5)
June (4)
May (8)
April (8)
March (7)
February (8)
January (7)

 2010


Tag Cloud


Share
RSS feed
Atom feed
Bookmark
Google
Delicious
Digg
MySpace
Facebook
Diigo
Yahoo
Stumble
Reddit
My Aol
LinkedIn

  Powered by WorldWide Merchant