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A Few Reasons to Use Clay Flowerpots in Your Yard



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Contain Invasive Plants

Clay flower pots are a great way to show off your favorite plants without threatening native species. There are lots of otherwise invasive plant varieties that look great when they are planted in separate pots: mint, ivy, honeysuckle, periwinkle, and certain types of ornamental grasses do best when they are kept apart from the group. Itís all the beauty of the plants you love without any of the hassles.

Keep Plants Healthy

Clay flowerpots have the unique benefit of being porous. This allows air and water to move through the walls of your pottery, which prevents soil disease and root rot. In fact, many plants like cacti and succulents actually prefer the drier soil that can be achieved with clay pots. Plan your plantings at the beginning of the season and watch them thrive!

Versatility

Clay flowerpots have a classic look that can be enjoyed indoors or out, depending on the types of plants you choose to grow. Their neutral tones mean that they can be placed just about anywhere without detracting from the natural beauty of your garden. This is a great way to keep the focus on your plants.

Stability

Clay flowerpots are heavier than their plastic counterparts, which will help avoid tipping in the wind. They are also still lightweight enough to move if necessary. This contrasts with stone or concrete planters, which are typically too heavy to move once they are placed. So, go ahead: rearrange to your heartís content!

Clay flowerpots lend a natural, classic look to any garden. Their beauty doesnít stop there, though! Over the years, clay flowerpots actually acquire a beautiful patina that is extremely attractive to homeowners and visitors alike. This sign of age is highly sought after and can even lend an extra element of character to your garden.

Some Notes to Maximize Success

While clay flowerpots are a great asset to any garden, there are a few things to consider before decorating the entire yard. There are two critically important factors to consider:

  1. The temperature of your space
  2. The amount of water your plants need

Clay flowerpots will crack and break if they are left outdoors in cold weather. This is because the clay holds water, which expands and contracts as you would expect during temperature fluctuations. We recommend choosing a few methods to protect your clay flower pots during freezing winter temperatures.

Similarly, clay is porous, which means that you will need to water your plants more frequently than usual to maintain the same levels of moisture in the soil. This doesnít bother most gardeners and can even be an asset for those who plant cacti or succulents.

Donít wait to get the garden of your dreams! Contact Arizona Pottery Contact Arizona Pottery today to learn more or view our selection of terracotta clay pottery to enhance your own garden.



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Post Last Updated: 2/20/2020 2:04:38 PM 
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