The Pottery Post Blog
 

Creative Containers



 8786-Creative-Containers

We want to provide some fresh
container ideas to brighten up your garden or patio areas.  Give some of these ideas a go and let us know how they work out for you.

If you have to have a habit when it comes to your garden and patio areas why not make it trying to create new planters for your home.  Planted pots offer color, fragrance and beauty to all areas of your home.  By using beautiful flowers or lots of green houseplants you can create wonderful combinations that are decorative.

 8787-Garden-Containers

When thinking about how to create wonderful and healthy garden containers you have a number of things to consider.  Start with the plants needs.  Most colorful containers start with considering the soil, water, food and light needs your plants need.  You don't want water logged roots which will rot if there are no drain holes in the pottery.  Make sure to replenish nutrients that leach from the soil by fertilizing containers weekly.

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Choose sunny spots if necessary.  When you choose plants think about where that container will sit when it comes to sun needs.  Try not to mix plants that have different needs so that they will all get along at the same time.  Avoid mixing them up to much and try planting one type of plant or flower at a time.

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Make sure you use the correct potting soil so that your plants are given the best shot for a healthy production of color and growth.  When picking plants pick a combination of richly hued foliage and ruffled leaves and texture if possible.  Finally clustering containers together makes a wonderful and colorful display that really brightens up a porch or patio.

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potted containers, garden, home and garden, flowerpots



By
Post Last Updated: 2/28/2018 3:08:51 PM 

Late Winter Potted Primrose



 8761-Potted-Indoor-Primr

Available for sale at most Garden Centers this time of year, the Primrose plant is colorful and a welcome sight.  After long cold month's of winters cold and grey these delightful flowers are a needed lift.  It's still a bit early to pot them outside in some areas but you can still grow them indoors until the weather warms up by following a few simple tips.

The first thing to remember is that a primrose plant is not meant to last and last.  They usually last a few weeks outdoors in garden planters, showing their colorful flowers and then die off to be replaced with other seasonal plants.  So if you decide to try them indoors just keep this fact in mind.

 8762-Potted-Primrose

As with most plants a potted indoor primrose does not like to sit in water.  Their roots will rot if the soil is kept too moist.  Once the soil starts to feel dry you need to water them and then give them a misting.  They love humidity.  Don't let the soil dry out completely or they will die quickly.

 8763-Potted-Primrose

As with most plants a potted primrose likes sunlight.  So make sure they are getting as much direct or indirect sunlight as possible.  When it comes to fertilizing any indoor plant including a potted primrose they like to be fertilized once a month except when in bloom.  Don't fertilize when in bloom.

 8764-Potted-Primrose

Primrose
are pretty inexpensive to purchase so if you fell like giving this a go with trying to grow them indoors you won't have a lot of money invested and the outcome if successful is well worth the beauty and color that you will experience.  Purple, White, Orange and Pink are all favorite colors.  That's about it.
 
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potted indoor primrose, primrose potted, indoor potted plants



By
Post Last Updated: 2/22/2018 12:47:35 PM 

Vines & Climbers for Garden Planters



 8821-Vines-And-Climbers-

We try to offer great suggestions for creating garden planters and today we want to talk about vines or climbers that are perfect for pottery.  Adding a vertical touch to all kinds of planters is not as hard to do as it seems. When you display a cluster of different pots with plant materials it always looks best when you use different sizes and heights.  Here are the best climbing vines we think that will add a elegant touch to any garden pot.

 8819-Ivy-In-A-Garden-Pla

Ivy - There is nothing that works better and is used more often then placing trailing ivy draping over the outer rim of a garden planter.  It has the ability to twist and turn so it can easily fill in where you want it to most.  This is a great place to start because it is the most common and easy to use.  What we truly love is the different foliage it offers.  From deep green to variegated and it stays green all year long.

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Morning Glory - It's one of those you will really enjoy because of the colorful blooms it has.  Not only is it really easy to grow but it adds lots of color and beauty with it's flowers.  This is one plant you don't want to grow in the ground because it will take over any garden area. It's durable and wild.  Stake it in a garden pot and it train it to go up for a wonderful vertical dispaly.

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Climbing Hydrangea - We love this for containers that are in the shade or partial shade.  It's grows pretty aggressively so you may want to pot it up by itself.  It also needs a large planter to grow in and doesn't like being contained by a small container.  Hydrangea is know for being fragrant so it's perfect for a patio or porch where the fragrance can greet your guest.

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Bougainvillea - In Arizona we know this plant well. It really does great in the warm climate and it's stunning colorful flowers add so much to our desert landscape.  Unfortunately it has barbs on it and is not the most fun to keep trimmed and under control.  It's considered more of a shrub because it grows out and not just up.  You may have to protect this plant in winter months.

Here are a few suggestions that we hope interest you.  If you give one a try let us know how you did. We would love to hear from you.

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potted climbing vines, potted climbing plants, potted planters, garden pottery, home and garden planters, pots



By
Post Last Updated: 1/17/2018 2:00:52 PM 

3 Reasons Your Containers Might Fail



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3 main reasons why your container plants fail.  Sounds pretty basic so lets dig right in.  There are not a lot of reasons why a potted planter may being to show signs of stress.  Often it has to do with the plants and what is going on under the soil.  Here are a few reasons to help eliminate guessing.

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1.  Vine Weevils - Grubs can come on sudden and destroy a potted plant arrangement in no time if you don't catch them early.  Even though they don't fly they can grip to most plant surfaces and can easily crawl across walls and ceilings. Then they lay eggs in the soil.  They can come in a nursery planter so check carefully before potting up the plants you bring home.  Once the eggs hatch they burrow into the soil and feed on the roots.  Obviously the plant can't take much of that and will stress out leading to death.

The best thing to do is egg shells to the soil mix. Their sharp edges discourage them greatly.  Adults can be picked off the plants.  You can then add parasite nematodes to the soil to control the larvae.

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2.  Poor Drainage - This is a obvious one.  If your garden container doesn't have proper drain holes or if those holes get blocked with soil the planter becomes waterlogged and the wet soil will suffocate plant root system.  Once the roots dye, top growth will collapse and your plant can die overnight.  You want damp not wet soil that drains well.

Here it's best to start with broken pot shards covering the drain hole. This let's the water drain but keeps the soil from plugging up the planters drain hole.  If using a saucer keep the saucer empty once the pot has fully drained.  Don't let the planter sit in standing water.

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3.  Starvation - Nobody thinks about your plant starving especially if you use new potting mix.  When you water your plants, the water will leech out the soil nutrients eventually leaving your healthy plants sitting in nutrient depleted soil.  Because your plants are contained and can't search for nutrients they will eventually collapse and die.

Here is where fertilizer comes into play.  No matter how good your potting soil is, your garden containers will need regular fertilizer treatments.  Try to use a good organic fertilizer and follow instructions well.  Over fertilizing can burn your plants roots and also cause stress.

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contained planters, garden pottery, garden planters, container tips, garden containers, planters, pottery, pots



By
Post Last Updated: 1/17/2018 12:28:26 PM 

Why We Love Terracotta Pottery



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Yep, we can honestly say we LOVE terra-cotta garden planters!  When Arizona Pottery first started that is all we sold.  Nothing but real clay garden pottery and some accessories.  They were and still are the basis of our business.  You may ask yourself why do we love terracotta planters so much?  Well, let us explain.

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Plant Health - Terracotta breathes.  This means the clay, which is real and harvested out of the ground is not so compact that it lets air thru it.  This also means water will saturate the pot and seep.  A plants roots like good air circulation and clay flowerpots are know for being healthy.  Once you use real clay you will find that your houseplants will perform better.

 8807-Terracotta-Pottery

Watering - Since a clay pot is porous it will keep water from sitting in the bottom of the pot, soaking the roots and possibly drowning them.  The water will seep into the clay and dissipate.  Unfortunately if you have chemicals in the soil or water they will show up on the sides of the pot as a white calcium line.

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Beauty - Because real terracotta pottery is porous it will start to age and show it's wear.  Many folks really like this and will even take steps to age their clay containers by applying yogurt or milk to the outside of the clay pot.  Everyone has a different idea of what beauty is but we love the aged, rustic look of terra-cotta pots and planters.

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Selection - Arizona Pottery imports real clay flower pots from Italy, China, Mexico and Vietnam.  Each factory uses their own clay mix or will harvest the clay out of the ground using their own firing process.  Some clays are smooth and silky like the Italian, while the Mexican clay is dark and very porous.  So porous and heavy that it will start to break down the first year of use.  We love the old traditional styles of Rolled Rim Garden Planters as well some of the newer more contemporary styles. There is always something to choose from.

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Many Uses - Yes real clay garden pottery will break but that doesn't mean you should toss them.  You can re-purpose them into pot shards to fill the bottom of your larger containers.  The terracotta shards will shield the drain hole and keep soil from plugging it up.  You can stack large pieces into pots and create a fairy garden or elf shelf.  Don't toss those broken pieces.... think outside the box and have fun with them.

 8812-Terracotta-Pottery-

So those are a few of the reasons why we love our terracotta home and garden planters so much.  If you wish to share your thoughts we would love to hear them.

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real clay pottery, terracotta pots, terra-cotta pottery, planters, garden pottery, pots



By
Post Last Updated: 1/30/2018 9:36:14 AM 

 Comments (2) Last comment made 
25
2/22/2018 12:52:02 PM 
Arizona Pottery 2/22/2018 12:52:02 PM 
Hi Elaine, Once you get those calcium and salt deposits on the outside of the garden planters it's next to impossible to get them off. It's best to seal the pots before you use them with Thompsons water seal from Home Depot. You need to keep the chemicals in the potting soil and the fertilizer and water from leaching into the clay.

Elaine stamate 2/10/2018 2:05:24 PM 
What treatment or type of oil do I put on the outside of my pots as they have water marks I do not like. I know there are many home remedies for it but canít find out what. Thanks


Transition Containers To Winter



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If you haven't taken the time to take an inventory of your fall garden containers, then now is the time to do so.  Do the flowers look spent, or the veggies given up and the grasses no fared well in the winter wind gusts?  Then it's time to transition them into winter items that will hold up to the cold and harsh weather that is coming.

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The first thing you need to do is toss all the plants and replace the potting soil.  Now is not the time to try to salvage anything.  Pick new plant materials that can with stand the harsh conditions coming in the colors and textures that will easily mix up and create a beautiful arrangement.  Add color with painted sticks, berry branches or colorful shades of greens and yellows.

 8785-Containers

Fill your winter containers with Birch Branches.  They look lovely when clustered together and add a depth of texture to a garden container that is lovely for many months.  Ever seen colored branches like dogwood?  They come in red to yellow and you can find other textured branches like reeds or thin sticks that come in brown and can be woven and displayed beautifully.

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When it comes to plants try evergreens like boxwood that can be made into topiary.  Conifers of all sorts will work wonderfully.  Any kind of greenery that can handle the cold will be stunning covered in a light snowfall.

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Berried branches like winterberry and dried seed pots add an artistic touch that really upgrades any garden container.  Ornamental grasses add height to the center of a planter and trailing ivy flows over the pots sides, draping the planter in color.

Don't wait till it's too cold to transition your planters.  Now is the time to make the most of the remaining weather.

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winter containers, winter pottery, planters, pots, terracotta, clay pots



By
Post Last Updated: 12/13/2017 2:48:43 PM 

When To Water Your Garden Planters?



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You selected the perfect garden planter, you researched and purchased the best kinds of plants and now you ask, When is the best time to water?  Good question.  You want to make sure when it comes to watering your potted plants you get it right.  Of course we all know that too much or too little can kill most plants and make those garden planters look pretty bad.

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First you must make sure that your garden pottery has drain holes. Even succulents & cacti don't like to sit in standing water.  Then early morning is the best time to water your planters.  This is because the sun is barely up and the temps are still pretty cool.  Now is the time that water can penetrate the soil and get down to the roots before being evaporated by the sun & heat.

Watering your planter early also means that the plants will have time to soak up and store some of the water before they are dried out and waiting in the afternoon.  Don't believe that spraying the leaves of the potted plants and then having the full sun hit them will scorch them or cause burning. That is simply not true.

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The second best time to water your potted garden planters is late afternoon or early evening.  What you are trying to do is to avoid watering your containers in the middle of the day.  If you wait till early evening try not to get water all over the plants leaves.  Letting the water sit on the leaves can cause pathogens and disease.  So if you have a choice always go with morning or late morning.

Do NOT water at night.  You think it's a good time to water your planters so that they can soak up all that moisture but it really causes disease like stated above because there is not evaporation.

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So to rap this up, here are a few last tips.

Don't overwater - look for limp or soggy leaves, rotting at the stem or tips browning.
Water consistently over the surface of the soil and not your leaves. When you water, water deeply.  The deeper the better for encouraging the potted plants roots to spread throughout the planter.

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watering planters, water garden pottery, watering containers



By
Post Last Updated: 9/27/2017 12:44:56 PM 

Protecting Garden Planters Over Winter



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As the years go by you find yourself collecting more and more garden planters.  Many of them are very expensive or just ones that you love very much.  So of course you want to protect them from Winters cold and damage.  Here are a few tips that may help ease your discomfort.

Before anything you need to clean them out and clean them up.  Of course this is only for garden pottery that is empty and being stored.  Start by dumping the soil into a compost pile or recycle can.  You will not be using it again so it has to go.  You do not want to pass on any bugs, mold or fungus that may be growing in the soil so get rid of it and start fresh next season.

 8549-Wrapping-Garden-Pot

Use a wire or stiff bristle brush to scrub off any chunks of soil that are sticking to the inside of the flowerpot.  Then mix a bucket of 1 part bleach to 10 parts water.  Now scrub the inside with the bleach mix to disinfect the pot and make sure any thing that may be still attached to the insides are killed or removed.  Let the pots dry completely before storing them in the garage or shed.

Ideally all garden pottery and planters should be stored indoors over the winter months.  May planters are frost resistant but not frost proof.  This means they can handle light frost but not freezing weather.  If there is standing water from rain or drip system in the soil and the soil freezes, the water will expand and crack the planter.

 8551-Winter-Protection-F

If you are leaving the empty planters outdoors, try flipping them over and use bricks, pot feet or wood to keep them off the ground.  You can cover the empty containers with a large garbage bag to keep the water off or cover with burlap wrap.  If you can't flip them then just fill them with hay or mulch to protect them from the water and cold.

If you can't move the garden planters and need to keep them planted then you need to top the pots with mulch to keep the water out and the roots from freezing.  We like wrapping the planter with burlap and string to help.  Plastic bubble wrap works etc.  We know it's not the most beautiful look but if it saves your planters from cracking it's well worth it.

 8580-Wintering-Garden-Po

The only exception for all the above information is a terra cotta flower pot.  Terra cotta is porous and absorbs water like a sponge.  This is healthy for the plants but obviously bad for freezing water conditions.  If you can't bring them in, get the pots off the ground, wrap in a waterproof bag or tarp and move them under a roof eave so water doesn't directly hit them.  If you can't do any of that then at least lay down a thick layer of mulch or hay to protect the top soil.

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Hope this helps and you find some of these tips for protecting your garden planters from freezing during Winter work.

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winter protection for garden planters, overwintering pottery, winter planters, protecting garden pots in winter.



By
Post Last Updated: 11/20/2017 11:22:56 AM 

Container Tricks



 8545 Container Tricks

Finding the most beautiful and healthy plants and flowers for your garden containers isn't that hard to do.  Most local nursery and garden centers carry a wide selection that are mostly healthy and lovely.  Now keeping them looking that way for as long as possible is the goal of every container gardener.  By following a few tips listed below you are well on the way to achieving that goal.

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1.  Pick the perfect garden pot.  Make sure you get the right size before anything else.  You do not want to put a palm into a pot that is so small it tips over in a robust wind or so little that it cramps the roots from growing and spreading.  All plants and flowers have roots that need room to grow in soil that has nutrients in it.  If a container is too large it can result in over moist soil and drown the roots.  If you have a lot of space in the pot and you keep the soil moist, you may get moss and mildew issues that are not welcome.  Also make sure you garden container has drain hole.  No standing water in flowerpots is recommended.

 8543-Container-Tricks

2.  Plant you new pottery container with a plan.  It seems harmless to just dig in and go for it but the result will not be as successful if you follow a few steps.  Make sure you use plants with the right light needs with where you are putting the finished pot.  A plant that needs full sunlight will not grow if you place the garden planter on a covered porch that sees mostly shade.  Try to mix flowering plants and colors with green foliage to fill in the planter and make them look overflowing and full.  Just make sure they need the same amount of water.

 8542-Container-Tips

3.  Be selective about the potting soil you use.  Never use garden soil for many reason but mostly you will NOT have healthy plants.  If you plant succulents make sure you are using pumice soil that drains well. If flowers are more to your liking a nice potting mix that has compost in it works great.  Don't recycle potting soil if you had diseased plants growing it in already.  Start fresh!  The main thing to remember here is never underestimate the power of the correct potting mix.

So follow these easy steps and you are well on the way to have garden containers that look stunning all season long. 

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garden containers, garden pottery, clay garden pots, clay garden pottery, home and garden pottery



By
Post Last Updated: 9/26/2017 2:40:01 PM 

What is Talavera Pottery?



 8473-Talavera-Pottery

Arizona Pottery sells one of the largest collection of talavera pottery, garden animals, luminarias, spheres and so much more.  We imported directly from the factory to our Tucson warehouse where we ship it across the US to you our beloved customers. So, you see it and you love it but let's talk a bit about what it is and where it comes from.

 8471-Talavera-Mexican-Pl

Talavera is one of the finest ceramics of Mexico and from the Spanish colonial period of rich old world design and colorful heritage.  Talavera pottery was first introduced to Mexico by Spanish guild artisans of the colonial perios.  Commonly called "majolica" in Spain, Mexican Talavera draws its name from the 16th century Spanish pottery center, Talavera de la Reina.

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The process to create Talavera pottery is elaborate and it has basically not changed since the early colonial period when it was first introduced.  The first step is to mix black sand and white sand. It is then washed and filtered to keep only the finest particles.

 8472-Talavera-Pottery 

Next it is shaped by hand on a potters wheel, then left to dry for a number of days. Then comes the first firing .  The piece is tested to see if any cracks occur.  The initial glazing, which creates a milky white background is applied.  After this, the design is hand painted. Finally, a second firing to harden the glaze.

 8469-Talavera-Pottery

One of the most desired things about talavera pottery is the bold bright colors and unique patterns.  Since each piece is hand painted they are one of a kind.  Everyone knows the look of talavera and it is well loved through out the world.

At Arizona Pottery we try to carry the largest and most unique patterns and designs.

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talavera pottery, hand painted mexican planters, mexican talalvera



By
Post Last Updated: 7/12/2017 2:57:00 PM 



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