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Late Winter Potted Primrose


Available for sale at most Garden Centers this time of year, the Primrose plant is colorful and a welcome sight.  After long cold month's of winters cold and grey these delightful flowers are a needed lift.  It's still a bit early to pot them outside in some areas but you can still grow them indoors until the weather warms up by following a few simple tips.

The first thing to remember is that a primrose plant is not meant to last and last.  They usually last a few weeks outdoors in garden planters, showing their colorful flowers and then die off to be replaced with other seasonal plants.  So if you decide to try them indoors just keep this fact in mind.


As with most plants a potted indoor primrose does not like to sit in water.  Their roots will rot if the soil is kept too moist.  Once the soil starts to feel dry you need to water them and then give them a misting.  They love humidity.  Don't let the soil dry out completely or they will die quickly.


As with most plants a potted primrose likes sunlight.  So make sure they are getting as much direct or indirect sunlight as possible.  When it comes to fertilizing any indoor plant including a potted primrose they like to be fertilized once a month except when in bloom.  Don't fertilize when in bloom.


are pretty inexpensive to purchase so if you fell like giving this a go with trying to grow them indoors you won't have a lot of money invested and the outcome if successful is well worth the beauty and color that you will experience.  Purple, White, Orange and Pink are all favorite colors.  That's about it.
[Read More] How to Grow a Avocado Plant Indoors.
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Arizona Pottery On-line Inc.

How to Grow a Avocado Plant from Seed


If you have read any health magazines you are probably already eating avocado.  Well, have you ever thought about potting up that big seed and seeing what will grow?  Many of us had the experience of trying to grow a avocado seed in school, where you poked holes in the sides of the seed with tooth picks and suspended the seed above a glass of water.  Yep, remember that?  Anyway, here are a few updated tips that will help you grow a real plant that you can pot up and keep.

First if you think that once you pot the seed and grow the plant you will be harvesting avocados that isn't going to happen.  Even if you get fruit it won't be quality fruit.  But, you can grow a healthy FREE houseplant that is lovely.


1.  Remove the seed from a ripe avocado.  Don't hit the seed with a knife but pull it out gently with your hand.  Clean under warm water.  Wrap seed in damp paper towel.  Place in plastic food bag (not zipper) and store in a dark cupboard.  Check every 4 days or so for germination.  Ensure the towel stays damp.


2.  When the seed germinates it will gradually crack open and a root will grow from deep inside the seed.   Don't break open the seed.  Just leave it alone.  When the root reaches 3" long it is ready to pot up.


3.  Start with a 8" flowerpot that has drain holes. Avocado plants like good drainage so use a new potting mix with perlite or sand to help out.  Plant the seed with the bottom and roots aiming down into the pot.  The bottom is the flat broader end.


4.  Fill the pot halfway with potting meet and place the seed.  Add more soil till the top inch of the seed is above level.  Water until moist not damp and add more potting soil to the garden planter as needed.  Place in a warm, draft free location with indirect sunlight.


Tips:  Avocados are tropical plants so they like warm, growing conditions and can NOT dry out.  Use consistent watering and mist if necessary.  Fertilize ever 3 months.  That is it. No toothpicks involved.  

[Read More] Tips to improve your indoor potting skills.
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Arizona Pottery On-line Inc.

Potted Flowers That Attract Hummingbirds


Potted Vine that attract hummingbirds.

Who doesn't love looking out a window and seeing those amazing hummingbirds flying around your potted flowers?  They are so small and colorful and they flap their wings so fast they make a humming sound.  They fly right, left, up, down and backwards!  Amazing creatures that everyone loves to see flying around their porch or patio setting.

Well, here are a few tips on plants that attract hummingbirds.  These plants and vines can be easily planted in garden containers and moved to where you can see them from indoor windows.  Or place the garden pots around your patio table so that you can enjoy the hummingbirds while relaxing or eating outside.

Hummingbirds like nectar-filled blooms so here are a few good suggestions:


1.  Trumpet Honeysuckle:  Hummers, butterflies and bees all love honeysuckle.  By keeping the potting soil moist and placing the garden container in full sun or even partial shade will you will the best flowering results.  The bright red flowers will attract the butterflies and hummers.


2.  Mandevilla:  Since this is a drought tolerant vine it's perfect for garden pottery but can also be used in a hanging basket. Put this container in full sun or partial shade with well drained soil.  This vine can climb so place the pot next to a patio pillar or garden fence.


3.  Canary Creeper:  Another wonderful vine that likes full sun or partial shade with moist well draining potting soil.  It can trail so you can put it in a hanging basket outside a kitchen window where you can watch the hummers eat.  If you look at the flowers closely they look like canaries. Potted canaries, who knew! Wonderful.


4.  Candy Corn Plant:  Love the look of these but you can't eat them.  Only the hummers can dive bomb this flower.  Again full sun and moist soil in your planters will work best.  You can move this potted flower indoors during winter and make it a houseplant if you want.

So here are few suggestions on what to pot up on your porch or patio and attract some hummingbirds.  Give one or two a try and let us know how it works out!

[Read More] Falling for Potted Sage
[Read More] Down in the dumps?  Indoor Flowers Help.
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